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elizabeth woodville school

Copy of design proposal (1)

SIXTH FORM PROSPECTUS

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Elizabeth Woodville School Sixth Form is committed to providing a high-quality, planned programme of careers education and guidance for all students.  In particular, we aim to prepare students for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.  Key themes running through the programme are:

  • Self-awareness - helping young people assess their own interests, skills, strengths and weaknesses, recording their experiences and developing their capabilities

  • Careers research - using resources, accessing specialist knowledge, investigating and weighing up the opportunities in learning and work

  • Career decisions - helping young people make realistic but ambitious careers decisions

 

In the Sixth Form you will be making decisions which will influence your future career. Whichever option you choose after Sixth Form, you will get advice and guidance to help you plan ahead. Our aim is to help you make realistic and informed decisions about your future. You will be encouraged to take responsibility for your own decisions.

 

Careers advice and guidance

We work closely with an independent Careers Information Advice and Guidance service called 'The Altogether'. Sixth Form tutors actively encourage their students to book career appointments with our Careers Advisor. Specific issues which impact on Sixth Former students include UCAS Personal statements, CV writing, extended work experience, support with interview techniques, advanced apprenticeships and higher education options.  We have a very active programme of Careers Education and Guidance in the Sixth Form, which looks at all the options. Personalised support is key.

 

Choosing a University course

Some University degree courses require specific A level choices although not all higher education establishments have the same requirements, and there is often a level of flexibility. However, if you apply with an unconventional combination of subjects for a particular course you may put yourself at a disadvantage in relation to other applicants.

 

Required or recommended?

When carrying out research into university courses some A level subjects will be cited as ‘Required’ and are therefore essential and others will be ‘Recommended’ which means that whilst they are not necessarily essential they will be the qualifications held by the majority of people applying for that course. The most up to date information is usually on the UCAS website which may also direct you to individual university websites, and university Admissions Officers will respond to specific queries if the answer cannot be found on the website.

 

Facilitating subjects

Although they may not be specified as required subjects, many successful applicants to popular courses in some of the most prestigious and Russell Group Universities do have A level qualifications in at least two of the facilitating subjects (see below).

 

Some of these courses may still have a preference for some of the facilitating subjects and one or two universities may be more prescriptive in their subject requirements – check the Entry Profiles on UCAS Course Search.

  • Maths and Further Maths

  • English Literature

  • Physics

  • Biology

  • Chemistry

  • Geography

  • History

  • Languages (Classical and Modern)

 

There are some A level subjects which provide suitable preparation for entry to university generally, but which are not included within the facilitating subjects, because there are relatively few degree programmes where an advanced level qualification in these subjects would be a requirement for entry. Examples of such subjects include Economics and Religious Studies.

 

Some courses will be happy with a subject at a lower level (for example, at AS-level instead of A-level). This will be something to check before you apply.

 

Some popular degrees will often be open to you without any specific subject background; these include: Accountancy, Anthropology, Archaeology, Business Studies, History of Art, Law, Management Studies, Media Studies, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology and Surveying.

 

Please note that this list is for guidance only and not exhaustive, students are strongly advised to carry out research into particular entry requirements if they have a fixed career goal in mind. UCAS course search is a good source of information for current courses.

Careers & higher education